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Old 30th March 2014, 07:32   #1
Tohno_Neil
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Why not create a output plug-in with "clip protection" ?



Why not create a output plug-in with "clip protection" ?

I REALLY need a output plug-in with "clip protection",with it,I can listen to music more happy。
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Old 30th March 2014, 13:33   #2
ryerman
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"Prevent clipping" is available natively.

General Preferences > Playback > Replay Gain tab > check "Use Replay Gain" and select from drop-down menu for "Amplification mode".

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Old 30th March 2014, 19:20   #3
Tohno_Neil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryerman View Post
"Prevent clipping" is available natively.

General Preferences > Playback > Replay Gain tab > check "Use Replay Gain" and select from drop-down menu for "Amplification mode".
Thank you.

You know ,"Use Replay Gain" is not a good way to protecte freqfrequency。

USE High Resample and “clip protection “ ,we can do this (“Prevent clipping“ ) more earlier and helpful .

And I always listen to a whole ape-file with a cue-file ,use the “cue player “ plug-in ,so “Use Reply Gain “ is not a good idea for me .

^ _ ^
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Old 30th March 2014, 21:55   #4
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Preferences -> Playback -> Equalizer has the limiter option (which is defaulted to on) which is there to help prevent clipping.

but the best way to avoid clipping is to ensure your files are correctly encoded (as badly encoded files which are already clipped are going to cause problems when trying to 'fix' things afterwards) and that you're not pushing the output volume and EQ levels more than they should be (as once things are passed from Winamp's output plug-in to the system, if you push the speaker volume, there's _nothing_ Winamp can do to know about such things).
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Old 31st March 2014, 04:55   #5
Tohno_Neil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrO View Post
Preferences -> Playback -> Equalizer has the limiter option (which is defaulted to on) which is there to help prevent clipping.
Okay,thanks.
People are have no idea about it, because of the Winamp's Advertising strategies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrO View Post
but the best way to avoid clipping is to ensure your files are correctly encoded (as badly encoded files which are already clipped are going to cause problems when trying to 'fix' things afterwards) and that you're not pushing the output volume and EQ levels more than they should be (as once things are passed from Winamp's output plug-in to the system, if you push the speaker volume, there's _nothing_ Winamp can do to know about such things).
Sometimes the Record labels or Music publishers use unusual parameters and code,

Exact Audio Copy was not care about it,

this time,

the files are truly correct encoded, but Files will be played back with "boom".

that is not ENCODER's fault.

Do you have any solutions about this?



——————————————————————————————————————————---

High Resample and “clip protection “ ?

Last edited by Tohno_Neil; 31st March 2014 at 07:27.
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Old 2nd April 2014, 07:30   #6
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dude, RG is the best way, b/c it has tags that show peak levels, and so they can be used on playback if prevent clipping is picked. it IS "clip protection" ....that is science, and has NOTHING to do with winamp advertising campaigns, dick cheney, or aliens.

I do not use the limiter, and I suggest no one else use it who doesn't have to.

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Old 2nd April 2014, 12:46   #7
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Hi Tohno_Neil,

Yes music publishers have been engaged in a 'Loudness War' for years. Excessive clipping can cause distortion, not the 'boom' you hear. Distortion not only sounds bad, but can damage your speakers if played at a high enough volume. On the other hand, some slight amount of clipping can increase the dynamics in the music and cause it to sound better.

The Winamp ReplayGain implementation lowers the dB level of the overall song during playback to soften it's overall volume. Then you can use your volume control to make the music louder (hopefully without the 'boom'). If you don't want to use RG or it doesn't help with the 'boom', then you can try using the Winamp equalizer (with or without it's limiter enabled) to slightly lower the frequency levels in the music that contribute to the 'boom'. 'Boom' is usually associated with the frequencies around 125Hz.

http://digitalprosound.digitalmedian...le.jsp?id=8953

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Old 11th April 2014, 10:22   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aminifu View Post
The Winamp ReplayGain implementation lowers the dB level of the overall song during playback to soften it's overall volume.
That statement could be misleading.

The Winamp ReplayGain implementation attempts to keep the encoded playback volume of all files analyzed by it to a consistent overall level (about 89dB). This usually lowers a file's encoded volume, but it could increase it as well.

After the analysis, tags are added to each music file containing the info needed to adjust the encoded volume during playback. Other than adding these tags, no other changes are made to the files.

Winamp is not the only app that is able to use these tags for adjusting the overall encoded volume during playback. Some apps (and devices) do not use these tags, in which case they are ignored and the files playback at their encoded volumes. Winamp (and other apps/devices that use RG tags) can be set to ignore these tags via it's playback options, when you don't want them used.

So there is no downside to using RG tags (other than the 89dB level which some think is too low). The Winamp implementation also includes amplifiers that can be used to further adjust the encoded playback volume (up or down) if RG is applied or not.

RG is best used for leveling overall playback volume when listening to a group of files encoded with vastly different volumes. RG can also be applied in a way that will maintain the variance for songs on an album that are intended to have volume differences.

There are other ways to achieve volume leveling (see article in link below).

http://forums.winamp.com/showthread.php?t=345520

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