Old 17th September 2007, 14:23   #1
offi
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what have to do to play winamp mp3 in 48000 kHz

what have to do to play winamp mp3 in 48000 kHz??
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Old 17th September 2007, 16:39   #2
soulstace
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First, you need to surgically replace your ear drums with those of a bat's. Without them, you probably won't be able to tell the difference.

EDIT - Nevermind. You're probably talking about sample frequency. However, even in this case, I still don't think you'll be able to hear the difference.
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Old 17th September 2007, 17:11   #3
flocksoft
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the standard output plugin cannot resample the audio and I don't know third party output plugins to do this...

if your audio card has native support for the ASIO, you can use this Winamp output plugin: http://otachan.com/out_asio(exe).html (the resample feature is in the plugin preferences)

else, to add ASIO support in Windows, use this: http://www.asio4all.com/

PS1: using this output plugin in Winamp, you cannot change the volume inside Winamp and remember: the only supported output plugin here is the default one (Nullsoft DirectSound Output on Windows 2000/XP)
PS2: JFYI this resampling is done by output plugin not by input plugin, so every sound produced by Winamp will be resampled at 48000 Hz, not just mp3 (as you asked)

/edit: another output plugin with resampling (at least judging by image) and without ASIO requirement (so you should able to change the volume): http://www.winamp.com/plugins/details/144971
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Old 18th September 2007, 19:31   #4
offi
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thank u flocksoft

ps
i think that my quastion was not enough precise, sorry.
I wanted to find a plug-in for files mp3 in 48000kHz,
cause sometimes some people making that kind of kHz, and winamp didn't accept it.
That plug-in what u recomended me workin perfect, but everything plays in 48000kHz
For me doesn't matter I hearing in 44100kHz or 48000kHz.
Good that i do not have to use now shity windows media player for mp3 48000kHz), but maybe there is single plug-in which accepting 48000kHz ?

Last edited by offi; 18th September 2007 at 20:37.
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Old 21st September 2007, 00:21   #5
flocksoft
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using a recent Winamp version (last stable & only supported here is 5.35) with the bundled default mp3 plugin (in_mp3.dll; avoid others like mad mp3 or mp3 pro, etc.) you'll able to play 48 KHz mp3s with no problems without no particular output plugins (as suggested before)
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Old 21st September 2007, 08:26   #6
kzuse
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If you use DirectSound it even doesn't matter whether your soundcard supports this samplerate (although I have to say that virtually every soundcard today does support it, because the AC97 internal link rate is 48 kHz). The DirectSound driver for your soundcard would automatically resample it if your soundcard didn't support it.

So you don't need to do anything. Just install the newest version of Winamp (5.35), no 3rd party plugins (do a clean install) and you should be able to play these files.
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Old 21st September 2007, 11:01   #7
ulillillia
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Quote:
Originally posted by kzuse
If you use DirectSound it even doesn't matter whether your soundcard supports this samplerate (although I have to say that virtually every soundcard today does support it, because the AC97 internal link rate is 48 kHz). The DirectSound driver for your soundcard would automatically resample it if your soundcard didn't support it.

So you don't need to do anything. Just install the newest version of Winamp (5.35), no 3rd party plugins (do a clean install) and you should be able to play these files.
I've tested this myself. On an old store-bought, off-the-shelf Hewlett Packard, I could play a 6,000,000 Hz sample rate file with 8-bit, mono without any problems. Beyond that, however, I'd only get buffer errors (cannot allocate enough memory for a buffer). A test several years later with different hardware (the AC'97), I could get 4 million Hz sample rate. Modern sound cards, with bigger buffers, probably could get even higher than 10 million, but I haven't tested this. It's easy to test too, though you'll need to use a hex edittor (I can explain or provide some test cases if you want).

void BlueWater() {water.color=blue; while(GameRunning) {if (fox.pos == InBlueWater) {fox.air--; FoxDrown(fox.air);} else {fox.air=1800; fox.flags = WantsToGetWet; } WaitFrames(1); }} // My top favorite thing in 2D Sonic (as C)
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Old 21st September 2007, 11:55   #8
kzuse
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I guess you know that the soundcard does not actually play the sample with that rate. It is of course downsampled by DirectShow. The highest sample rate which is practically used is 384 kHz, but this is very rare. The highest "commonly used" sample rate is 192 kHz or, even more common, 96 kHz.

88,2 kHz and 64 kHz are not quite common, 48 kHz is *very* common in professional and broadcasting environments (actually it is the only one used there), and 44,1 kHz is only used for Audio CDs (CD-DA) and most MP3's (as they are CD rips). DVD for standard uses 48 kHz (of course, other rates such as 96 kHz are possible, e.g. for Dolby Digital audio tracks).

Also please note that the human ear cannot recognize any frequencies beyond 20 kHz (and thus does not require sampling rates of higher than ~ 40 kHz). Maybe 48 kHz is useful for editing and overdubbing reasons as the higher rate allows for some "reserve", but everything beyond that's just kind of voodo magic, you know (aah no, actually DVD Audio was invented for the convenience of bats).

:-)

Best regards,
kzuse

PS: There are more convenient methods to change the sample rate of a RIFF WAVE file, but using a hex editor is one of them, yes. I prefer using CoolEdit.
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Old 21st September 2007, 12:13   #9
ulillillia
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I only knew of WinDAT that can do that, but that program won't run on Windows XP (it's so old, it's from the Windows 3.1 era!). For the hex edittor, you need to modify the dword at 0x18 (big endian order) and likely the dword at 0x1C (bytes per second). I always use a hex edittor for XP.

void BlueWater() {water.color=blue; while(GameRunning) {if (fox.pos == InBlueWater) {fox.air--; FoxDrown(fox.air);} else {fox.air=1800; fox.flags = WantsToGetWet; } WaitFrames(1); }} // My top favorite thing in 2D Sonic (as C)
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